Radon is a colorless and odorless gas that seeps into buildings and is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.

As uranium and radium decay, they emit radon gas. This occurs naturally in soil and rock, but can enter a home through cracks in walls, basement floors, and foundations. It may also contaminate the water in private wells. The main source of high-level radon pollution in buildings is Uranium-containing soil such as granite, shale, phosphate and pitchblende. Radon levels measure the highest in homes that are well insulated, tightly sealed, and/or built on uranium-rich soil. Because of their closeness to the ground, basement and first floors typically have the highest radon levels.

Radon gas is believed to be a leading cause of lung cancer, second only to cigarette smoking. The American Lung Association has stated that radon is responsible for thousands of deaths annually. Exposure to the combination of radon gas and cigarette smoke creates a greater risk for lung cancer than either alone.

For homes with very high radon levels there is no question that corrective action is needed. Scientists estimate that lung cancer deaths could be reduced by 2 to 4 percent, about 5,000 deaths, by lowering radon levels in homes where radon levels exceed the EPA’s recommended action level of 4.0 pCi/L.

Testing is the only way to know if your home has elevated radon levels. Indoor radon levels are affected by the soil composition under and around the house, and the ease with which radon enters the house. Homes that are next door to each other can have different indoor radon levels, and other influences can cause radon levels to vary from month to month or day to day. While both short-term and long-term testing is available, a long-term test is a better indicator of average radon level.

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  • radon (1)

  • Easy to read dyameter to see if radon system is working

    Easy to read dyameter to see if radon system is working

  • Radon decompression suction point in the concrete floor

    Radon decompression suction point in the concrete floor

  • Radon barrier (20 mil) to keep moisture and mold contained in a crawl space area

    Radon barrier (20 mil) to keep moisture and mold contained in a crawl space area

  • Exterior radon exhaust mounted outside extending above the roof line

    Exterior radon exhaust mounted outside extending above the roof line

Contact Healthy Homes and schedule your Radon Test TODAY. Or, visit our online store for instructions to buy and perform your own at home “Do it Yourself” radon kit and have it shipped in to Dr. Riegel for testing and analysis. Dr. Riegel recommends that the radon level in your home does not exceed 2.0 pCi/L.

In the meanwhile, these quick steps, advised by the EPA can be taken to help lower your risks from radon exposure:

  • Stop smoking and discourage smoking in your home; it may increase the risk of radon exposure.
  • Spend less time in areas with higher concentrations of radon, such as the basement.
  • Whenever practical, increase the airflow into and through out your house, especially in the basement.   (If you home has a crawl space beneath, keep the vents on all sides of the house fully open all year).